chiropterror:

According to this;

Bearded Vultures, naturally, have black and white plumage. Their feathers have no other colors, and the only natural colors they have are in their orange eyes, and the red ring around them (called the scleral ring). The color of the scleral ring actually comes from their blood, which they can force into the ring to make themselves more intimidating.

So where does the rusty orange and fiery red plumage come from?

It can’t come from their diet, like flamingos, as these guys eat bones and bone marrow.

It comes from the dirt. Or, more specifically, it comes from the iron oxide found in red dirt. These guys will take dust baths and preen the color into their feathers, very intentionally. Birds observed while in captivity have been seen doing this for almost an entire hour.

While there is no solid evidence to support most theories, the most commonly held belief for why they do this is status. Older birds tend to have brighter colors than younger birds, and females seem to have brighter colors than males. Observers believe that these birds just really like the color red; not only are they attracted to the red dirt, they also seem to like red wood and red leaves.

These grooming rituals are now instinct in the species; individuals have colored their feathers with no outside prompting.

nefarious-tropy:

Bearded Vultures (Korkeasaari zoo)

nefarious-tropy:

Bearded Vultures (Korkeasaari zoo)

notmusa:

if we lived in a world where all animals were as domesticated as dogs
i would have a bearded vulture named uncle fester

notmusa:

if we lived in a world where all animals were as domesticated as dogs

i would have a bearded vulture named uncle fester

dezzoi:

lammergeier/bearded vulture

nefarious-tropy:

A bearded vulture (Korkeasaari Zoo)

swallowsndaggers:

Aivaras Ly as featured on Swallows&Daggers.

swallowsndaggers:

Aivaras Ly as featured on Swallows&Daggers.

(via swarmofswords)

Sometimes your heart needs more time to accept what your mind already knows. — Unknown (via spacemen-3)

(via swarmofswords)

marialuisa-pr:

gynocraticgrrl:

Jessica Rey presents the history of the evolution of the swimsuit including the origins of its design, how it has changed overtime and the post-feminist association of the bikini symbolizing female empowerment. She refers to neuro-scientific studies revealing how male brains react to images of scantily clad women versus images of women deemed modest and what the implications of the results are for women in society.

(Note: As the OP, I disagree with Rey’s approach to putting the onus on women to alter ourselves rather than to alter the male perception of women – brain wiring has plenty to do with socialization and if we worked against the culture that fuels men’s objectification of women, women’s clothing choices would matter far less in terms of how men perceive us and determine how to interact with us).

 

bolding mine

(via laugh-addict)